Rosemary Olive Oil Crock Pot Bread

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It was a typical day – lost in the open sea of Pinterest pins, drifting farther and farther from reality and any notion of passing time – when something caught my eye. That something, my friends, was Crock Pot Rosemary Olive Oil Bread. Just like the kind from Romano’s Macaroni Grill, this bread featured tons of the fresh herb, a deliciously golden crust, and moisture and flavor from the olive oil that brings it to a whole ‘nother level of delicious.

Rosemary Olive Oil Crock Pot Bread

The main reason I was excited, though, was because this bread was supposed to be made in the crock pot. This is especially useful around this time of year when we are trying not to turn on the oven for any reason (we’re getting into 90 degree territory up here now). The crock pot won’t warm up your house like an oven will, but you can still have flavorful, fresh artisan bread at the end of the day to pair with your meals, with wine and cheese, or to enjoy by itself.  If you’re a bread fanatic– a carb connoisseur, one might say– like me, you understand why I was so excited.

Rosemary Olive Oil Crock Pot BreadRosemary Olive Oil Crock Pot Bread

But when I clicked through to the recipe, the directions weren’t for the crock pot. In fact, the only place anyone mentioned the crock pot was in the comments. Le sigh. The bread still sounded amazing, of course, but I had been fooled by a pinner who just decided to tack on “Crock Pot” for one reason or another. Instead of sulking, I decided to try my hand at making my own Rosemary Olive Oil Crock Pot Bread.

Rosemary Olive Oil Crock Pot Bread

What I wound up with was a flavorful, enjoyable loaf with a crispy crust and a super soft inside. I served it to my family with dinner and the bread was gone in a matter of minutes. Granted, I may or may not have eaten half (or more) myself… We don’t judge here. Then I made another and tweaked a few things, and it was even better. Unfortunately, I didn’t take pictures that time, so let me just tell you that the recipe I’m giving produces bread that is slightly less dense inside than the pictures appear, but even softer and more delicious. It’s a minor but change but one you’ll appreciate, I’m not deceiving you. Promise.

Rosemary Olive Oil Crock Pot Bread

This is a great anytime loaf of bread, it doesn’t require a stand mixer, and you don’t have to heat your house or use up oven space while you prepare dinner (except for an optional 3-5 minute trip under the broiler to darken up the crust, but trust me, that short time isn’t going to heat up the house). Does it get any better than that? You can take your time to answer… in the mean time, I’m just gonna throw together another loaf.

2.5 from 2 reviews
Rosemary Olive Oil Crock Pot Bread
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
This Rosemary Olive Oil Crock Pot Bread has the same flavors as the Macaroni Grill favorite, but is made in the Crock Pot so you don't have to heat up the whole house. Best of all, it's extremely easy to make, and you don't even need a stand mixer!
Author:
Recipe type: Bread
Ingredients
  • 3½ cups all purpose flour
  • 1 packet dry active yeast (2¼ teaspoons)
  • 1¼ cups warm water
  • ¼ cup fresh rosemary, chopped, divided
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt or kosher salt, divided
You will also need:
  • Parchment paper
  • Paper towels
  • Crock Pot
Directions
  1. In a large bowl, mix together the water, yeast, and sugar. Let sit 10 minutes. The mixture should become bubbly.
  2. Stir in half of the salt (1/2 teaspoon), half of the rosemary (2 tablespoons), the 3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil, and all of the flour. Mix until fully combined. Work it together with your hands, if necessary.
  3. Lightly grease a large bowl and place the dough in. Cover it with a kitchen towel and leave the dough in a warm, draft-free area. Let it sit and rise for 1 hour.
  4. Remove the dough from the bowl and gently roll it into a ball on a floured surface. Let it sit for another 20 minutes.
  5. Set the crock pot to high. Line the crock pot with two pieces of parchment paper, leaving at least 2 inches hanging out of each side of the crock pot. Place the dough in the crock pot and sprinkle it with the remaining salt and rosemary.
  6. Drape paper towels over the top of the crock pot and then place the lid on. This should capture any moisture that would sit on the lid and prevent it from dripping back onto your bread.
  7. Cook the bread for 2 hours, and remove from the crock pot. It will most likely still be a bit pale on the outside. It tastes great this way, but I like to put mine on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and put it under the broiler for a quick 3 - 5 minutes to get a crunchier, darker crust.
  8. Let cool before slicing. Serve with extra olive oil drizzled on top.

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Comments

    • says

      Leah, I did a little research online and it seems that that should work fine, but I can’t speak from experience. Let me know after you try it if it all turns out as expected!

  1. Amanda says

    Can you fix the recipe so that it tells you to add the olive oil? I just made this and only realized after it was in the crock pot that there was no olive oil in the recipe! You have to read all the comments to find this out, which most folks don’t do before they start cooking!

    • says

      Just tear off a long piece and place it in the crock pot in a U-shape, and then take another piece and do the same perpendicular to the first piece, so four sides come to the top of the crock pot in different directions and the majority of the inside of the pot is covered with parchment paper. I hope that makes sense… if not I’ll try to explain it differently!

  2. Tess says

    Oh my gosh thank you! I was so sad when I lucked on to the one (probably the same one as you) that said it was for the crock pot but wasn’t! I cannot wait to try this bread!

  3. Ginger says

    Good evening, Like most everyone else here, I too was duped by the other “crock pot” bread. Can’t was to try this one… Thanks! My question is about the parchment paper… What if I don’t have any? I currently am living in China and often can’t find this kind if thing (most people don’t even have ovens here as everything is prepared stove top). So, what if I skip that step? Does anyone know what will happen to my precious bread?

    • says

      Ginger,
      I wasn’t aware that most people don’t have ovens in China– how interesting! Anyway, the purpose of the parchment paper is to ensure that your bread doesn’t stick to the crock pot and you can easily pull it out. Instead, generously grease the bowl of the crock pot with oil or nonstick cooking spray. Your bread may crisp up slightly more on the sides as a result, but besides that, you should get basically the same result!

      • Ginger says

        Thanks so much! I kinda assumed that was the case, but I wanted to make sure I wasn’t missing some crucial bit of information. I can’t wait to try it! I’m off to find myself some flour now. I love cooking and baking, but it’s much more of a task here than it was in the States.

      • Ginger says

        Well, I finally got time to make this bread yesterday. It was a HIT!!! And apparently all my Pinterest followers who’ve also seen and pinned it will now be making it. I had no problems without the parchment paper. I just spread a bit of EVOO in my crockpot and everything was just fine. Thanks so much for this recipe. It was so easy that now I’m wondering what other varieties of bread I can make in there. :)

        • says

          That’s great, Ginger! So happy to hear everything wound up working out for you. I’m curious to find out what other breads would work well in the crock pot, too. I’ll try to come up with some recipes, and if you think of anything, let me know!

  4. says

    Crock pot bread? Sold. Also, i really appreciate those little notes like, instead of 1 packet of yeast, the measured amount. very helpful, thank you. I am SO EXCITED to do this. It’s fall here now, and I LOVE my crock pot in the fall because it makes the closed up house smell so wonderful as you walk in with slightly red cheeks from the crisp air…….. sigh. The best. Making this tonight. and tomorrow. and a gillion other times i’m sure. Christmas dinner? done. thank you thank you thank you!

  5. Cara says

    Tried it this afternoon and it turned out really well! The only issue I found was that my crock pot had a hot spot and thus one side got a lot darker then the other. Note to self for next time: turn the insert part way through. Thanks for posting this!

  6. says

    Thanks so much for the post! Some people cook on high…I was wondering how cooking it on low is compared to those who cook on high. Another cracked the lid open with a wooden spoon toward the end. I haven’t done it yet, but plan to soon. Also, how did you get that “print” button to work-like if I wanted to put something like that on my blog? To get a printable recipe. That was nice.
    Blessings, Laura R.
    (Rhodes Creations)

    • says

      I couldn’t personally tell you how cooking on low compares, but hopefully someone can weigh in on that if they’ve tried it. The print button is from the WordPress Plug-In “Easy Recipe”! Thank you, Laura.

  7. Michelle says

    What size crock pot are you using for this recipe? I have a smaller one (maybe 3 quarts?) but I assume you’re using a larger one.

    • says

      I have two crock pots, the one I used for this recipe was pretty average in size. You should be able to do it with a small one, although your bread may turn out denser or darker around the edges (but that’s not necessarily a bad thing)!

  8. says

    I’m sorry to say this came out terrible. The dough wasn’t smooth, kinda flour-ery. I had high hopes .Not sure I want to try it again. I loved the idea though.

    • says

      I’m sorry to hear that, Maria! This can sometimes be an issue with measuring flour by cups rather than weight– how much flour you use depends on how densely packed your cups are. If you ever do try it out again (or any other dough-related recipe) and your dough isn’t the right consistency, add more of the liquid ingredients until your dough is nice and smooth. Unfortunately there are always variables in dough-making like the weather, temp of the ingredients, density of ingredients, etc. so it takes a bit of practice to get used to. I can’t say for sure that is what the issue was, but that’s my best guess. Again, I’m sorry to hear it didn’t work out well for you =(

    • says

      Beth, I’m really not sure, as I’ve never used a bread machine. I’m curious though, so if you give it a go please let me know how it turns out!

      • Jackie says

        Sorry, I don’t know how to delete. The dried herbs were fine; next time I will add some Parmesan cheese to the top before broiling. Also, the crockpot liner=awesome.

  9. says

    I am gluten sensitive. Is there an alternative to the general purpose flour that I could use the make the bread gluten free? Rice flour for example?

    • says

      I don’t have any experience making GF bread, so I don’t want to steer you in the wrong direction here, but I don’t see why you couldn’t sub in a GF flour alternative– as long as you make sure to use the proper substitution ratio for whatever you decide to use. For example, if you use rice flour, you’re going to want to use slightly less than the recipe calls for. Probably closer to 3 1/4 cups.

  10. Linda says

    this was GREAT! so glad you came up with this…we didn’t even bother to use the boiler with it. so good.

  11. Linda says

    this bread has become my everyday bread. I hope you don’t mind but I shared it on Sparkspeople I gave you credit for it..

    • says

      105-110 is the perfect temperature, but if you’re not exactly in that range, you’ll be fine. You just don’t want the water to be too hot, or it will kill the yeast, and too cold won’t activate it.

  12. Christiane says

    This bread is SO good. I just tried it for the first time and it came out perfectly fine. I only used 2 Tbsp of olive oil, added minced olives and used thyme instead of rosemary – it took 2 hours and 25 minutes to bake it. It’s super fluffy inside but has a perfectly crunchy crust. The paper towel trick worked really well, in addition I wiped off the moisture a few times. Now I am already thinking about the variations I could try next: sundried tomatoes & pine nuts, roasted onions & red pepper flakes, or maybe cinnamon and raisins with canola oil instead of olive oil? Anyway, thank you very much for sharing this recipe! :)

    • says

      I have never used it for sandwiches, personally, but I don’t see why it wouldn’t work. It is a denser bread though, unlike typical sandwich bread, so just keep that in mind!

  13. sofiajr says

    Hello! Just a quick question – what size crockpot did you use? I have a ridiculously large one. Do you think this would work or should I 1 1/2 the recipe? Thanks!

    • says

      I have never used a large crock pot to make this, so I don’t know if it will have an impact on the bread or its shape, but I’m leaning towards it not making a huge difference. If you do try it (either with the original ratio or 1 1/2x), please let me know how it goes. Also, if anyone else has used a large crock pot to make this recipe, please feel free to comment with your insight!

  14. Karen says

    I have made this bread once and am about to make it again. This bread is very tasty! It tastes best while still warm dipped in olive oil and herbs like in some Italian restaurants. I followed directions completely with the exception of wanting it to have a saltier flavor, so I added the whole tsp of salt into the bread and sprinkled some on top before it started baking. I lightly brushed the top with some olive oil after placing it in the crock pot, and that helped the top brown slightly. Great way to make bread in the summer without heating up the house!!! Thanks for sharing a great bread recipe!

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